Candidates for Secretary of State

alexia sabor

1.

Q: What motivated you to run for this office?

A: I am excited to bring new energy and a vision to revitalize this office. Republicans want to make the Secretary of State the only person to oversee our elections, arguing that the office lacks any real responsibilities. While I oppose partisan oversight of our elections, I believe we need a strong Secretary of State to push back against this dangerous concentration of power. I will use the seat as a bully pulpit in defense of our democracy, to increase civic engagement through education, and to help voters understand what’s at stake in our elections.

2.

Q: What relevant experience do you have for this position?

A: I have a Masters degree in Conservation Biology & Sustainable Development and a Ph.D. in Forest Ecology & Management, so I have the expertise to make smart, sustainable resource management decisions about the natural areas managed through the Board of Commissioners of Public Lands (BCPL). As a former PTO President, I know the value of funding K-12 education and will make sure that the $1.1B BCPL trust funds continue to provide much needed revenue to our public schools.

I was a project manager for 10 years at a tech company, a job which I left to run for Secretary of State full-time, and I know how to run complex, long-term projects involving a variety of stakeholders. I’m also the current Chair of the Democratic Party of Dane County and in that capacity I have successfully worked to increase voter turnout, help voters understand how our government and political parties work, and protect our elections.

3.

Q: What is the most important function of this office?

A: Currently, this office has two important functions. One, as mentioned above, is serving on the Board of Commissioners of public lands, which oversees 77,000 acres of natural areas in Wisconsin and manages $1.1B in trust funds. Protecting and managing those lands is critical right now, not only because it provides funds for Wisconsin’s school libraries, but because as we’re faced with climate change we need to make sure we protect our natural resources and all the species that live here, including us. 


The other important function is issuing apostilles, which are frequently required to conduct business overseas or complete overseas adoptions, so they’re necessary to ensure the Wisconsin businesses and families that need them can flourish.

4.

Q: What are you planning to do with the office to make it more relevant than it has been? (after the attacks on the office by Governor Walker and the GOP)

A: I will bring a fresh perspective and new energy to this office. I’ll elevate the importance of the Secretary of State by using it as a loudspeaker for democracy to educate voters and push back on attempts to undermine our elections. As a local County Party Chair, I’ve worked to increase civic engagement through outreach by educating people about how our electoral processes, government, and political parties work. I would continue doing this critical work as Secretary of State because understanding is key to building trust, and lack of trust is at the heart of what’s eroding our democracy.

 

To address the GOP’s argument that this office does not have enough responsibility, I plan to review the responsibilities they have removed from the office over the last 40 years, to whom those responsibilities have been moved, and how much more that costs taxpayers in additional salaries or reduced capacities for other services. I think it’s a fine idea to grow the office, but that’s going to happen in conversation with voters and not because right-wing extremists want to manipulate the office to their advantage.

5.

Q: What concerns you most about the recent attacks on voting rights and election administrators?

A: The far-right wing of the GOP is doing everything they can to sow mistrust in our electoral system. By throwing up roadblocks for voters, attacking election administrators, and supporting sham investigations, fringe Republicans are disenfranchising Democratic voters, while energizing their base to get out to vote. As Democrats, we have to push back hard, every single time, against their lies and energize our own voters to get to the polls. The GOP has extreme candidates coming hard for the Secretary of State office so they can use it to certify elections their candidates win and claim election fraud if their candidates lose. We cannot allow that to happen. I’m running for fairness and transparency for all the people of Wisconsin, so I oppose partisan oversight of our elections. It would be a dangerous concentration of power to have elections certified by a single person, as the Republican candidates are seeking. Instead, we should bring back the Government Accountability Board, which was a national model for nonpartisan election oversight.

6.

Q:  What are three characteristics or kinds of experience that makes you a better candidate than others?

A: 1) I recognize that information is powerful. I will be relentless in speaking and writing the truth about our elections through press releases, public speaking, and social media. 
2) I will help elect Democrats get elected up and down the ticket by being active all year long, all cycle long, all around the state. Building coalitions of enthusiastic voters is how we work together  to make progress and push back on the GOP agenda. As Chair of my local county party, I have worked hard to build out our network of neighborhood grassroots action teams, build relationships with diverse groups, and increase outreach to rural Democrats by collaborating with the Democratic Rural Caucus. Under my leadership, we turned out over 42,000 more votes for Biden/Harris than we had for Clinton/Kaine.  
3) I am a fierce defender of human rights and have volunteered as a clinic escort to help people bypass anti-abortion protesters to get the healthcare they needed. As a woman whose reproductive rights are now almost nonexistent in Wisconsin, I am motivated to run for office to advocate for the rights of every citizen whose rights are currently being threatened, including people of color, LGBTQIA folks,  and immigrants.

7.

Q: If you do not win the primary election, will you support the candidate who does?

A:Yes. I’m running for this seat because, by offering voters something substantial to vote for, I think I offer the best chance at defeating the Republican candidate in the general. Just like races for Lt. Governor, Treasurer, and U.S. Senate, however, I will work hard to get whoever our nominee is elected.

Doug La Follette

1.

Q: What motivated you to run for this office?

A: My very serious concern that a Republican controlling the office could in the future mess with the election results.
And I was urged to run because of people. Thought I had the best chance of winning the general election in November.

2.

Q: What relevant experience do you have for this position?

A: I have been elected to this position many times getting more votes than other Democrats and even winning twice when governor Walker and the Republicans swept the State.

3.

Q: What is the most important function of this office?

A: Because the Republican have removed most of the duties, the important function now is the issuing of Apostilles for international business and trade.
And very importantly fight to protect our election process from tampering
And keep it free from politics.

4.

Q: What are you planning to do with the office to make it more relevant than it has been? (after the attacks on the office by Governor Walker and the GOP)

A: I will continue to fight to restore the important business related functions to the office. But because of the gerrymandered Republican control of the legislature I’ve not been successful and the future may not be much better.

5.

Q: What concerns you most about the recent attacks on voting rights and election administrators?

A: The fact that the election process and our democracy have come for close to being lost these last couple of years.
The fact that the Republicans have become so ultra partisan does not bode well for the future.

6.

Q:  What are three characteristics or kinds of experience that makes you a better candidate than others?

A: Please refer to my answers to questions one and two.

7.

Q: If you do not win the primary election, will you support the candidate who does?

A: Yes certainly